François Chaignaud

Petites joueuses

Dance
Musée du Louvre
novembernov 4 – 16
1/2

World premiere

Non-stop from 7:30pm to 11:30pm

Includes a free visit to the exhibition "Figures du Fou. Du Moyen-Âge à la Renaissance"

Prices € 15 to € 38
Subscribers € 15 and € 28

Bookings from 14 June

Musée du Louvre

Monday november 4

19h30

Monday november 4

19h50

Monday november 4

20h10

Monday november 4

20h30

Monday november 4

20h50

Monday november 4

21h10

Monday november 4

21h30

Monday november 4

21h50

Monday november 4

22h10

Thursday november 7

19h30

Thursday november 7

19h50

Thursday november 7

20h10

Thursday november 7

20h30

Thursday november 7

20h50

Thursday november 7

21h10

Thursday november 7

21h30

Thursday november 7

21h50

Thursday november 7

22h10

Saturday november 9

19h30

Saturday november 9

19h50

Saturday november 9

20h10

Saturday november 9

20h30

Saturday november 9

20h50

Saturday november 9

21h10

Saturday november 9

21h30

Saturday november 9

21h50

Saturday november 9

22h10

Monday november 11

19h30

Monday november 11

19h50

Monday november 11

20h10

Monday november 11

20h30

Monday november 11

20h50

Monday november 11

21h10

Monday november 11

21h30

Monday november 11

21h50

Monday november 11

22h10

Thursday november 14

19h30

Thursday november 14

19h50

Thursday november 14

20h10

Thursday november 14

20h30

Thursday november 14

20h50

Thursday november 14

21h10

Thursday november 14

21h30

Thursday november 14

21h50

Thursday november 14

22h10

Saturday november 16

19h30

Saturday november 16

19h50

Saturday november 16

20h10

Saturday november 16

20h30

Saturday november 16

20h50

Conceived by François Chaignaud. With (in progress) Esteban Appeseche, Cécile Banquey, Marie-Pierre Brébant, François Chaignaud, Samuel Famechon, Florence Gengoul, Pierre Morillon, Cassandre Muñoz, Marie Picaut, Alan Picol, Maryfé Singy, Ryan Veillet. Artistic collaborator Baudouin Woehl. Musical direction support Marie-Pierre Brébant, Alan Picol. Costumes Romain Brau. Lighting design and management Abigail Fowler. Costume management Alejandra Garcia. Administration, production mandorle productions – Garance Roggero, Jeanne Lefèvre, Emma Forster. International distribution agency A propic – Line Rousseau, Marion Gauvent. 

Delegated production Mandorle productions
Mandorle productions is subdivised by the Drac Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes – ministère de la Culture and the Région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Coproduction Musée du Louvre ; Festival d’Automne à Paris
Residencies Ménagerie de verre ; CND Centre national de la danse ; La briqueterie CDCN du Val-de-Marne
François Chaignaud is an associate artist of Chaillot - Théâtre national de la Danse, the Maison de la danse de Lyon - Pôle Européen de Création and the Lyon Dance Biennial.
With the support of Dance Reflections by Van Cleef & Arpels

The Musée du Louvre and the Festival d'Automne à Paris are co-producers of this show and present it as a co-production.

With the support of

The Festival d'Automne continues, for the third year in a row, its partnership with the Louvre Museum. Together, they have been building up a collection of new contemporary performances dedicated to the museum and its works. On the occasion of the 'Figures du fou. Du Moyen âge aux romantiques' exhibition, which explores the subversive value of the foolish or the nonsensical in medieval society, the dancer and choreographer François Chaignaud brings us Petites joueuses. In this piece, an immersive and uninterrupted journey through the medieval Louvre, mutant and resonant creatures take over its fortifications, giving rise to a somewhat disturbing carnival.

'Petit joueur' finds its female equivalent in the term 'petite joueuse'. In this piece, 
the choreographer François Chaignaud reappropriates this pejorative term, synonymous with cowardice and lack of ambition, in order to subvert its meaning. He affirms, via the uniqueness, insolence and lightness of moving bodies, different ways in which we can take up the public space. In doing so, he blurs the semantic field of grandeur which is attached to places devoted to art. We are confronted with petites joueuses - female 'lightweights' or 'amateurs' - performing in the Grand Louvre. They invent their own rules, and go against the different codes. By creating confusion, playfulness, and equivocation, they undermine the effects of authority that this immense exhibition machine carries with it. By approaching the Louvre in this way, at its opposite end, this community of performers brings to the surface the archaeological layers of its medieval elements. Each visitor takes it in turn to discover its foundations, gaining access to a living, breathing, restless organism populated by figures ranging from the serious to the comical. Petites joueuses acts as a counterpoint to the 'Figures du fou. Du Moyen âge aux romantiques' exhibition. A singing nave, then, which affirms the centrality of the margins.